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Features

‘Toto’s pizzeria serves up a feast of archaeology’ from “the Colchester Archaeologist” magazine no 23 in 2010

The little strip of land between Museum Street and Cowdray Crescent where the War Memorial stands is an archaeological treasure trove. Here, buried beneath the shops and offices, lies precious remains of important monuments of Colchester’s Roman and Norman past.   These include a massive Roman foundation, over four metres wide, which carried a once impressive facade and a large monumental arch leading to the massive Temple of Claudius. These remains are exceptionally well preserved because they lie under the earthen bank of Colchester castle. But there is much more. Don Shimmin, who has been following recent building works in this important part of the historic town, explains how some puzzling fragments of foundation in Museum Street are likely to be part of a medieval barbicon – a defensive structure which helped protect the castle’s main entrance. The area around Museum Street and Castle Bailey is of exceptional archaeological interest. The southprecinct wall of the Temple […]

Features

An Ossian connection in Essex?

The true nature of the Braxted folly in Braxted Park, Essex, has been in question. The building has been variously described as an ice house, a bath-house, a hermitage or a cave. However, the map evidence is clear, because on […]

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Features

About St John’s Abbey

From Colchester Archaeological Report 1 . (iii) The accounts of the foundation and early history of St John’s Abbey There are four key texts relating to the early years of St John’s Abbey, of which two contain material concerning the […]

Features

Druids in Colchester?

Mention the Druids to the media and you’ve got yourself a story or two. And that’s what happened with the Stanway site. Mike Pitts, editor of British Archaeology, has been pushing the idea that our ‘doctor’ at Stanway was in […]